Crash and Salvage Team from USS Bataan to Complete Revised Refresher Training First

first_imgBack to overview,Home naval-today Crash and Salvage Team from USS Bataan to Complete Revised Refresher Training First August 27, 2013 Crash and Salvage Team from USS Bataan to Complete Revised Refresher Training First View post tag: USS Training & Education View post tag: Defence View post tag: Naval View post tag: Refresher A flight deck crash and salvage team from amphibious assault ship USS Bataan (LHD 5) completed refresher training at Naval Air Technical Training Center (NATTC) Aug. 24. During their week at the training center, team members received hands-on training in fighting flight deck fires, proper crash and salvage procedures, and safely lifting and moving damaged aircraft using a crane.Bataan’s crash and salvage team came to NATTC, on board Naval Air Station Pensacola, for the specialized training to bring new members up to speed and to refresh veteran members’ skills.In addition, Bataan’s team was the first to go through the crash and salvage team training course following recent revisions.“The hands on training we get at NATTC is a quintessential element to being ready for our next deployment,” said Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Handling) 1st Class Sheldon Popo, Bataan’s Crash and Salvage Team leading petty officer. “Since the last time we were down here, we have swapped out more than 60 percent of the Crash and Salvage team personnel. The new team members have never done crash and salvage work, and all need the hands on experience they get here. On the ship we can’t practice firefighting with live fire on actual aircraft, or crash procedures on actual aircraft, but here we can. NATTC’s training and equipment will help our team be ready for an actual crash.”Popo was a part of the team last time they came to Pensacola, and he said the recent changes to the course have greatly increased its value.“We can now go inside the burning aircraft, and move the aircraft that apply to us on a big deck amphibious assault ship,” he said. “These improvements make this training even more realistic.”The added level of realism was one of the reasons the course was changed. Chief Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Handling) Geoffrey Wyatt, NATTC’s Shipboard Crash and Salvage Course Leading Chief Petty Officer, explained that the fleet provided feedback on ways to improve the realism of the training.“The changes requested by the fleet were easy to safely implement, and we were able to quickly update the course and make it more realistic. The goal of the course is to make the experience as close as possible to what a crash and salvage crew will actually do in an emergency.“Now when we train with the Mobile Aircraft Firefighting Training Device (MAFTD), we have them use the A/S 32 P-25 firefighting vehicle to clear a path through the fire to the aircraft door. The team then proceeds inside of the smoke filled MAFTD, retrieves ‘Rescue Randy,’ the simulated crewman, and then egress the aircraft,” said Wyatt.Another element added to the training allows the team to continue through the MAFTD using a Naval Firefighting Thermal Imager (NFTI) to locate any remaining hot spots that need to be extinguished and cooled.“All of these changes make the training more realistic, and place the tasks in the order that the teams will have to conduct them during an actual emergency in the fleet,” Wyatt said. “We have reduced the amount of classroom training and increased the amount of hands on lab training. All of this hands on training is conducted in a safe and controlled environment under the supervision of our crash and salvage subject matter experts, who have returned from the fleet to instruct at NATTC.”Since its commissioning in 1942, NATTC has been committed to delivering training and increasing readiness within the Naval Aviation Enterprise. NATTC graduates approximately 15,000 Navy and Marine students annually. The majority of the student population is made up of enlisted personnel attending “A” schools, where they are learning the skills and knowledge required to perform as apprentice level technicians in the fleet. The center also provides airman apprenticeship training, personal financial management, and shipboard aircraft firefighting training. Advanced schools provide higher level technical knowledge for senior petty officers, and technical training for officers in aviation fuels, carrier air traffic control center operations, amphibious air traffic control center operations, aircraft launch and recovery equipment, and shipboard aircraft fire fighting.Additionally, NATTC supports the fleet by providing team training to ships personnel during their pre-deployment work-ups, to ensure that shipboard personnel have the proficiency required to take their ship on deployment, after a prolonged period in port.[mappress]Press Release, August 27, 2013; Image: Navy View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Defense View post tag: complete View post tag: Bataan View post tag: Training View post tag: Crash View post tag: Navy View post tag: from View post tag: Salvage View post tag: Revised View post tag: and View post tag: team View post tag: first Share this articlelast_img read more

HMS Duncan towed back to port after engine breakdown

first_img Authorities View post tag: Type 45 November 24, 2016 View post tag: Royal Navy View post tag: breakdown Royal Navy destroyer towed back to port after engine breakdowncenter_img View post tag: HMS Duncan Back to overview,Home naval-today Royal Navy destroyer towed back to port after engine breakdown Royal Navy’s Type 4 destroyer HMS Duncan had to be towed back to Devonport after experiencing a breakdown off Plymouth.According to a report by the Plymouth Herald, a Ministry of Defence spokesman confirmed this saying the ship had experienced “technical issues”.The ship was towed back to port on Tuesday, just two days after it left Devonport navy base together with a number of other ships deployed to NATO’s Standing Maritime Group 1.HMS Duncan, together with ships from the Spanish, German and Portuguese navies, was expected to sail to a European port after completing training in Plymouth.The Type 45 destroyers the Royal Navy currently operates experienced a number of breakdowns related to intercooler units on the ships’ gas turbines. As a consequence of a late design change that was insufficiently tested the destroyers were deemed unfit for operation in warmer waters.The Ministry of Defence confirmed in January 2016 the the ships are to undergo extensive multi-million pound engine refits.This was not the case with HMS Duncan’s breakdown on Monday, however. According to a tweet by NavyLookout, an independent online campaign to promote the Royal Navy, a burst salt water pipe and not a gas turbine failure led to the ship’s engine shutdown.Am hearing…HMS DUNCAN breakdown caused by burst salt water pipe – flood led to engine shut down. NOT Gas turbine failure this time pic.twitter.com/tdITpU8HCO— NavyLookout (@NavyLookout) November 23, 2016 Share this articlelast_img read more

Fuel Sweep Injury-Riddled IceMen on Garfield Night in Indy (Evansville drops third straight to…

first_imgFuel Sweep Injury-Riddled IceMen on Garfield Night in IndyEvansville Drops Third Straight To Finish Longest Road Trip Of The Year.INDIANAPOLIS, IN – Adorned in pastel orange Garfield jerseys, the Indy Fuel topped the yellow Odie-cladded Evansville IceMen Saturday 3-2 at Indiana Farmers Coliseum to complete a weekend sweep. The Fuel have won five straight over the IceMen and are 8-0 all-time at home against Evansville.The Fuel scored first on a power play late in the opening period, when Nick Mattson fired a one-timer past IceMen goalie Christoffer Bengtsberg for his first ECHL goal. In his first start for Indy Cedrick Desjardins stopped all seven IceMen shots in the period.Evansville rookie Vincent Dunn picked up his fourth goal of the current six-game road trip when he buried a centering pass from Sebastian Strandberg past Desjardins 5:54 into the second period. The IceMen outshot the Fuel 16-7 in the frameRhett Bly scored Indy’s second power play goal early in the third period from right in front of the net to put the Fuel back in front. Evansville again had an answer, when Nathan Moon stepped out of the penalty box and received a pass from Danny Hobbs. Moon skated in on a breakaway and beat Desjardins to even the score 2-2. Less than two minutes later, Peter Schneider deked an IceMen defenseman and lifted a backhander over Bengtsberg to give the Fuel the lead for good.Desjardins left the game with an undisclosed injury after Schneider’s goal and Shane Owen finished the game in net for the Fuel.The IceMen and Fuel have two more matchups this season, a home-and-home series March 11-12. Indy leads the series 6-2. The orange and yellow Garfield and Odie jerseys were auctioned off after the game, with a portion of the proceeds going to The Shelter Pet Project. Visit www.indyfuelhockey.com for more details.Evansville returns home next Saturday, February 6 to take on the Rapid City Rush at 7:15pm. It’s “Capes and Crowns Night” at the Ford Center, as fans are encouraged to dress up as their favorite superheroes or princes/princesses. Tickets are still available at the Ford Center Ticket Office or www.ticketmaster.com.—UPCOMING HOME GAMESSat. 2/6 – Rapid City at Evansville (7:15pm) – Ford CenterCapes and Crowns NightTues. 2/9 – Fort Wayne at Evansville (6:15pm) – Ford CenterFat Tuesday – Mardi GrasFri. 2/12 – Kalamazoo at Evansville (7:15pm) – Ford CenterYouth Backpack Giveaway, presented by Old National BankSun. 2/14 – Cincinnati at Evansville (6:15pm) – Ford CenterHeart Night – Valentine’s Day–INDIANAPOLIS, IN – Adorned in pastel orange Garfield jerseys, the Indy Fuel topped the yellow Odie-cladded Evansville IceMen Saturday 3-2 at Indiana Farmers Coliseum to complete a weekend sweep. The Fuel have won five straight over the IceMen and are 8-0 all-time at home against Evansville.The Fuel scored first on a power play late in the opening period, when Nick Mattson fired a one-timer past IceMen goalie Christoffer Bengtsberg for his first ECHL goal. In his first start for Indy Cedrick Desjardins stopped all seven IceMen shots in the period.Evansville rookie Vincent Dunn picked up his fourth goal of the current six-game road trip when he buried a centering pass from Sebastian Strandberg past Desjardins 5:54 into the second period. The IceMen outshot the Fuel 16-7 in the frameRhett Bly scored Indy’s second power play goal early in the third period from right in front of the net to put the Fuel back in front. Evansville again had an answer, when Nathan Moon stepped out of the penalty box and received a pass from Danny Hobbs. Moon skated in on a breakaway and beat Desjardins to even the score 2-2. Less than two minutes later, Peter Schneider deked an IceMen defenseman and lifted a backhander over Bengtsberg to give the Fuel the lead for good.Desjardins left the game with an undisclosed injury after Schneider’s goal and Shane Owen finished the game in net for the Fuel.The IceMen and Fuel have two more matchups this season, a home-and-home series March 11-12. Indy leads the series 6-2. The orange and yellow Garfield and Odie jerseys were auctioned off after the game, with a portion of the proceeds going to The Shelter Pet Project. Visit www.indyfuelhockey.com for more details.Evansville returns home next Saturday, February 6 to take on the Rapid City Rush at 7:15pm. It’s “Capes and Crowns Night” at the Ford Center, as fans are encouraged to dress up as their favorite superheroes or princes/princesses. Tickets are still available at the Ford Center Ticket Office or www.ticketmaster.com.—UPCOMING HOME GAMESSat. 2/6 – Rapid City at Evansville (7:15pm) – Ford CenterCapes and Crowns NightTues. 2/9 – Fort Wayne at Evansville (6:15pm) – Ford CenterFat Tuesday – Mardi GrasFri. 2/12 – Kalamazoo at Evansville (7:15pm) – Ford CenterYouth Backpack Giveaway, presented by Old National BankSun. 2/14 – Cincinnati at Evansville (6:15pm) – Ford CenterHeart Night – Valentine’s Day—FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

OSGOOD, EDITH M.

first_img80, of Whiting passed away, September 12 surrounded by her family. Born in Bayonne, she lived in Edison prior to moving to Whiting 20 years ago. She is predeceased by her husband, Ronald and her daughter, Karen Catsoulis. Edith is survived by her daughters, JoAnn Caliendo and her husband Jim and Renee Molchan and her husband, Bob and her grandchildren, Jessica, Alex, Danny, Kali, Alexis, Robby, Jimmy, Michael, Nicholas and Jonathan. Funeral arrangements by CARMONA-BOLEN Home for Funerals, 66 Lacey Rd., Route 530, Whiting, NJ.last_img read more

Cape May MUA Reaches Community With Recycling Message

first_imgBy Maddy VitaleWhen Cape May County Recycling Coordinator Linda Crumbock visits a school to teach students about recycling, she does her best to leave a lasting impression.The jovial and friendly former Verizon project manager, who performs in a band on some weekends and is a local performer throughout Cape May County, strums her guitar and sings tunes for audiences. She takes that level of creativity and energy to the classroom to show students, or rather sing to them, about the importance of recycling and how it is a way to protect and preserve the future.Crumbock takes her show on the road traveling to primary, elementary, intermediate and high schools throughout Cape May County.A visit from her means out comes “Tookie 2-Can,” a recycling mascot she created.Here is a link to the recycling song courtesy the MUA. http://evogov.s3.amazonaws.com/media/11/media/55222.mp3She slides on a faux-feathered costume and transforms into the Municipal Utility Authority’s jubilant mascot.Linda Crumbock shows the colorful mascot costume head for “Tookie 2-Can.”Then Crumbock performs a single-stream recycling song, which on the surface, may sound silly, but the lyrics describe to students, in a memorable way, why they should recycle:“2-Can says let’s pair up the cansCause trash and recycling don’t mix my friendsTrash in one canRecycling in the otherRecycling it’s the LawLet’s do it Right Together!” A great part of her job responsibility is preparing reports that are submitted to the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, distributed to municipal recycling coordinators and prepared for the Cape May County MUA board members.“However, my passion is interacting with people and ensuring they understand and comply with the Cape May County Recycling Program requirements,” Crumbock noted.For Crumbock, who began at the MUA in 2006, reaching students and residents with a strong and lasting message about recycling, is the most rewarding part of her job.“My job is education and outreach,” she said.Throughout the year, the MUA reaches out to the county’s schools to participate in recycling challenges. Many schools participate in the friendly competitions.One such challenge involves the MUA’s “Plastic Film Recycling Challenge for School,” which began Nov. 15 and ends April 15.The goal is to collect plastic film such as single-use bags that come from supermarkets and convenience stores, bags used for produce, newspaper sleeves, plastic wrap from cases of water and other items. All plastic materials collected must be clean and empty.The Ocean City Intermediate School students, staff and parents are working to achieve their goal of being a sustainable school. (Photo courtesy JASM Consulting)The MUA will award a composite wood bench from a company called TREX, which uses plastic film as feedstock for its products, to the school that collects the most plastic film based on student enrollment. The award will be presented during the 2019 Earth Day celebration April 20 at the Cape May County Park and Zoo.Crumbock said she is so impressed with all of the schools in the competition.One such challenge participant is the Ocean City Intermediate School, under the leadership of Principal Geoffrey Haines. His focus for his students is participation in order to learn and help clean up the environment.“The walls in their cafeteria have remarkably creative signs and murals that instruct the students on what materials to place in the trash and what goes in the recycling container,” Crumbock noted. “They also have peer-to-peer involvement. The students stand at the trash and recycling containers helping students clear their trays. It is really a great way they get the students involved.”Crumbock said that is what it is all about.“You involve students and make them feel the value of achievement. Here is their friend showing them how it is done,” Crumbock stressed. “The peer-to-peer method is so successful.”Haines too said the peer-to-peer model is very effective.“Talking with their fellow students at lunch, following the disposal and recycling model, instills the necessity to recycle, to recycle correctly and really drives the message home,” Haines explained.Ocean City Intermediate School students look out onto the MUA landfill at heaps of waste. (Photo courtesy Principal Geoffrey Haines)Haines said it is vital for schools to work with people such as Crumbock to spread the message about the importance of recycling.“I believe that stressing the importance of recycling here at school builds a culture within our students that enables them to make a change at their homes, relatives’ homes, neighbors’ homes, etc.,” Haines pointed out. “Providing examples of what waste does, how plastics effect our environment and wildlife, remains with impressionable minds.”One very vivid memory for some of the Ocean City Intermediate School students came during a tour, led by Crumbock in January, of the Cape May County recycling center landfill.“Seeing firsthand the sheer size of the landfill was an eye-opener.” Haines noted, adding that the landfill is the highest point or summit in Cape May County, with respect to sea level.He noted that it really makes a person realize how important it is to recycle materials and reduce waste.The Cape May County MUA is located at 1523 Route 9 North in Cape May Court House.Students learning what the processes are for collecting and processing recyclables, coupled with the non-recyclable materials that are in the landfills and the environmental impact when people do not recycle, reinforces and justifies the work of the students, Haines emphasized.While Crumbock has found huge success with schools such as OCIS, in which leaders and students are willing to work diligently to make a difference in order to clean up the environment, she also presents the recycling message to communities throughout the county.She visits churches, fire houses and other venues in order to speak about the do’s and don’ts of the Cape May County recycling program, and to let residents know about the all new CMCMUA Waste Wizard application on the MUA website www.cmcmua.com and also the Waste Wizard Mobile app for folks on the go.This new tool helps people determine whether a material is recyclable or trash, where materials are accepted for disposal or recycling, what their municipal trash and recycling schedules are and much more.There is also a Waste Sorting Game.Crumbock encourages everyone to test their knowledge of recycling and waste disposal, in a fun way by playing the game.Over the last two years, Crumbock said her speaking engagements and requests for the recycling center and landfill tours are on the rise.“It is a grassroots effort to get our communities not only educated about recycling and waste management, but also involved in the process. I speak to a group of say, 40 people. They go back and tell their friends and families, just as the students go home and discuss what they learned at school,” she noted.Crumbock continued, “They are the voices in the community that I cannot reach each and every day. The face–to-face engagements, what I like to call ‘my boots on the ground,’ are so effective, people are calling me more frequently to speak at their meetings.”She ended the interview with this thought, “In all of our hearts, we want to do the right thing. Educational outreach provides the tools to do the job of recycling correctly.”For more information visit the Cape May County Municipal Utilities Authority at www.cmcmua.com. Click the “How Do I Dispose Of …” link and play the Waste Sorting Game. Ocean City Intermediate School students use the writings on this board as a reminder of why they should recycle. (Photo courtesy Principal Geoffrey Haines) Cape May County Municipal Utilities Authority Recycling Coordinator Linda Crumbock is the featured speaker at the forum.last_img read more

SCI’s Kyle Hollingsworth Expands Charity Beer Festival To Asheville

first_imgBeloved String Cheese Incident keyboardist Kyle Hollingsworth recently revealed plans for his own Kyle’s Brew Fest to take place ahead of SCI’s run at Red Rocks, and, today, Hollingsworth has announced plans to bring his festival across the country. The first-ever Kyle’s Brew Fest in Asheville, NC is set to take place on July 2nd, serving as the official pre-party for the second night of SCI’s run in the musical city.Kyle’s Brew Fest Asheville will take place from 1-5 PM at New Mountain Asheville, and admission will get you in to see a Kyle Hollingsworth Band performance, a limited edition drinking vessel, craft beer tasting, and access to the Silent Auction. All proceeds will go to benefit Conscious Alliance.Tickets go on sale tomorrow, June 11th, at 10 AM, and can be found via Hollingsworth’s official website.last_img read more

Saint Mary’s Office of Admission adapts for prospective students

first_imgIn response of the closure of the College due to coronavirus, the Saint Mary’s Office of Admission is working diligently to address prospective students’ questions and concerns.Director of Admission Sarah Gallagher Dvorak said her office is facing unique circumstances because of the virus. While admissions counselors will be working remotely, prospective students will still be able to reach out to them.“This is a challenging time for sure, but we’re coming up with innovative solutions to still connect with prospective students,” Gallagher Dvorak said. “All our admissions counselors will have virtual office hours and [we will have] virtual receptions for areas that we had to cancel off-campus admitted student events.”According to the Office of Admission’s website, the deposit deadline for accepted students has been extended to June 1 in an effort to help families finalize their plans during this difficult time. Events such as Spring Day on Campus and Meet Me at the Avenue have been cancelled, but the Office of Admission is working to create an alternative.“Our plan is to host an event, and potentially more events, to replace Meet Me at the Avenue and Spring Day on Campus later in April. We’re finalizing those details now,” Gallagher Dvorak said.The Office has created several virtual opportunities for prospective students to keep connected to admissions counselors and student ambassadors. This includes twice weekly admissions presentations led by the Director of Admission and Admission Counselors each week over Zoom.“[In addition], families can set up virtual meetings. They can fill out a form letting us know the day/time they want to meet virtually and the format they want to use,” Gallagher Dvorak said. “They also give us a sense of the types of questions they have and whether or not they want a virtual campus tour led by our admission ambassadors.”Junior student ambassador Claire Linginfelter said some online tools could be used to give prospective students a virtual tour of the College.“[Ambassadors are] using the YouVisit tour that the school has already had and essentially using the same tour script as if you’re on campus,” Linginfelter said. “I can come and log in to [a Zoom group], answer questions for [prospective students] and give insight from a current student’s perspective.”In regards to the importance of student ambassadors in the Office’s outreach to prospective students Gallagher Dvorak said, “[Student ambassadors] will help us give virtual campus tours, text/email/call prospective students and their families, participate in Zoom meetings that target students who have interest in certain majors or areas of campus life and represent Saint Mary’s in a number of marketing efforts.”Linginfelter said she is proud of the department’s plans, and impressed with how quickly the Office of Admission has come up with a game plan.“It’s really nice to know that they are listening to our concerns and questions,” Linginfelter said.Tags: coronavirus, Meet Me at the Avenue, Office of Admissions, Prospective Students, Saint Mary’s Collegelast_img read more

Postemergence Herbicides

first_imgUsing postemergence herbicides to control problematic weeds has been recently successful for Georgia cotton farmers, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension weed specialist Stanley Culpepper.Two to three weeks of steady rainfall prevented many farmers from making postemergence herbicide applications in late May, a pivotal time for cotton plants to establish growth. These postemergence herbicides help to tame weeds like glyphosate-resistant Palmer amaranth, more commonly called “pigweed.”Pre-emergence herbicides helped growers make it through the period of constant, often heavy, rains, Culpepper said. Most postemergence herbicide mixtures, like Roundup, dicamba and 2,4-D, have also performed well. He added that even though applications of Liberty herbicide struggled during May’s consistently cloudy conditions, they regained effectiveness when the sun and heat returned in June. But as parts of the state continue to dry, the level of control offered by these systemic herbicides may decrease. Culpepper’s previous research on the UGA Tifton campus equipped farmers this year with management programs to suppress the development of pigweed. If it’s left uncontrolled, pigweed can grow as high as 10 feet.Pigweed has the potential to dwarf cotton plants and absorb sunlight, water and nutrients that cotton needs to grow. It also reproduces at high rates. A female plant can produce approximately 400,000 seeds in dryland cotton fields and 750,000 seeds in irrigated fields.“Successful weed control is greatly influenced by the ability of a grower to be timely in their implementation of each step of a sound system. It is very difficult to be timely when you can’t even walk in the field, much less drive through a field, which was the case in late May and early June,” Culpepper said. “Palmer amaranth is always a great challenge, and when the weed management program can’t be implemented in a timely fashion, the weed is more problematic. However, the new cotton technologies will help growers try to catch up.”Culpepper advises farmers to visit www.gaweed.com to learn more about cotton weed management programs. Farmers who use these programs should:Plant in pigweed-free fields.Apply two pre-emergence herbicides with active ingredients effective on Palmer amaranth.Apply sequential postemergence applications.Conduct a directed layby application.Growers must also understand the time intervals between two postemergence applications, he said. Intervals vary with specific technologies, so growers must be aware of the herbicides they apply and the directed length of time between applications.“If you are off a few days between sequential postemergence applications, it could have dramatic consequences,” Culpepper said.While herbicide applications are important in pigweed management, they can also be devastating to a cotton producer if they’re not correctly applied. According to Culpepper, most postemergence herbicide mixtures can cause twice as much damage when they’re applied in saturated soil. UGA Extension research also shows that it is best to avoid potential herbicide damage to cotton past the eight-leaf stage.To prevent cotton damage later in the growing season, Culpepper strongly recommends the use of a layby rig for herbicide applications. Equipment used during layby spraying programs applies herbicides to the base of the cotton plant, which improves weed coverage while it reduces herbicide damage. Additionally, a directed layby application allows growers to use a herbicide chemistries like diuron, Caparol and others, that is absolutely essential to sound, resistant management programs that will influence growers’ abilities to economically survive in the long term.For more information about issues related to cotton, see www.ugacotton.com.last_img read more

Long Trail Brewing becomes first Vermont brewery to receive Federal SHARP recognition

first_imgProject WorkSAFE, Vermont’s Occupational Safety and Health Consultation Program, is pleased to announce that Long Trail Brewing of Bridgewater Corners has successfully completed and met the requirements of the Safety and Health Achievement Recognition Program (SHARP).The company and the Vermont Department of Labor’s, Project WorkSAFE Program began working on the certification process over 12 months ago.“We applaud the employees and management of Long Trail Brewing in this accomplishment, especially in these tough economic times” said Scott Meyer, Manager of Project WorkSAFE.“We are excited about Long Trail’s continued leadership as a Vermont based brewer”, said Brian Walsh, President of Long Trail Brewing. Walsh went on to emphasize, “The SHARP recognition is an extension of the company’s passion to make award winning beer, but with emphasis on a safe and healthy environment for our brewing team.”Since 1989, Long Trail Brewing has been a regional brewer of high-quality, Vermont handcrafted alternatives to imported beer. The company has a genuine passion for brewing and keeping their employees safe in the process. In addition, Long Trail Brewing won the Vermont Governor’s Award for Environmental Excellence in April 2009 for their Eco-Brewing philosophy. The efforts of management and employees working together to reduce risk, therefore reducing injuries and illnesses, made the SHARP certification obtainable for this facility.Long Trail Brewing is the third brewery in the United States to obtain the SHARP certification. The SHARP program is a nationally recognized program implemented by states under Federal OSHA. The SHARP program recognizes small, high-hazard businesses with exemplary safety and health programs. Upon receiving SHARP certification, the workplace will be exempt from programmed inspections during the period that the SHARP certification is valid. Currently, there are over 1000 firms in the United States with the SHARP certification.The award is scheduled to be presented at Long Trail Brewing on March 31, 2010, 10 am at the Bridgewater facility.Source: VT Dept of Labor. 3.30.2010last_img read more

Avoiding executive retirement savings challenges

first_imgPlan design restrictions. Some new hires are required to finish a year of service before they become eligible to join the employer-sponsored 401(k) plan. According to Investment News, the U.S. Government Accountability Office estimated that being ineligible to save in a new employer’s plan for a year may result in $411,439 less in retirement savings. 15SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Sponsored by CUNA Mutual Retirement SolutionsEven as highly paid employees, credit union executives can face three challenges to saving enough to fund their retirements:401(k) limits. The IRS imposes a limit of $18,000 for 401(k) plans. This may prevent highly compensated employees from saving enough to have a retirement income near the 60 percent of their final salaries that is recommended to avoid a drop in their standard of living. continue reading » Non-discrimination test failures. Non-safe harbor 401(k) plans require annual testing to prove they don’t unfairly favor highly compensated employees. Failing this non-discrimination test can result in higher income taxes and fewer retirement savings for affected employees. According to judydiamond.com, $820 million in 401(k) contributions had to be returned to highly compensated employees in 2015 when over 54,000 401(k) plans failed non-discrimination testing. The affected executives then had to pay income tax on their returned contributions.last_img read more