Turkish diplomat among 3 shot dead in Iraqs Arbil

first_imgArbil (Iraq): At least one gunman killed three people including the Turkish vice consul to Iraq’s autonomous Kurdish region in an attack Wednesday in the regional capital of Arbil, a police source said. “Three people, including the Turkish vice consul, were killed in an armed attack targeting the consul and the consulate’s employees in a restaurant in Arbil,” the source told AFP, adding the attackers had fled the scene. Witnesses in the city said checkpoints had been quickly set up inside and around the neighbourhood of Ainkawa, which hosts numerous restaurants and the Turkish consulate. Also Read – US blacklists 28 Chinese entities over abuses in XinjiangTurkey confirmed that an “employee” at its Arbil consulate was killed in a shooting. The attack was not immediately claimed.Turkey is waging a major military offensive in Iraq’s mountainous northern region to root out pockets of the Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK). The PKK, seen as a “terrorist” group by Turkey, the United States and the European Union, has waged an insurgency against the Turkish state since 1984 and operates rear bases in Iraq’s autonomous Kurdish region. Also Read – Want to bring back US forces engaged in endless wars: TrumpSeveral rocket attacks have targeted diplomatic missions in Iraq in recent months, including rockets near the US and UK embassies in Baghdad’s “Green Zone.” The US in May ordered all non-essential personnel of its Baghdad embassy and Arbil consulate to leave the country.And in June, protesters gathered outside the Bahraini embassy in Baghdad, Authorities in Iraq, which is witnessing a period of relative calm since declaring victory against the Islamic State group in 2017, have pledged to protect embassies.last_img read more

Military withdraws from Labrador search for downed float plane victims

first_imgST. JOHN’S, N.L. — The Canadian military has ended its role in the drawn-out search for a float plane and three missing men following a crash into a Labrador lake almost a month ago.The RCMP have been leading the search for victims and the downed de Havilland DHC-2 Beaver in Mistastin Lake, about 100 kilometres southwest of Nain.Seven men, including the pilot, were on board the plane owned by airline Air Saguenay that crashed July 15. Four bodies have been recovered and three men are still missing.Maj. Mark Gough with Maritime Forces Atlantic said military divers sent to Mistastin Lake to assist the RCMP began their work on July 31.He said they concluded their work on Aug. 6 and left the site on Aug. 9.Six members of the Forces’ fleet diving unit from Halifax were at Mistastin Lake with remotely operated vehicles and side scan sonar technology to probe the extremely deep lake.The RCMP did not respond to requests for comment Monday about the status of its own search efforts. The cause of the crash remains unknown.Gough said the scale of the lake, the rough terrain and the unco-operative weather posed challenges.“It’s a big and deep lake,” Gough said. “They had to cover a very extensive area at very significant depths for a lake …. It’s a challenging area to work in.”The Canadian Presslast_img read more

Florentino Perez Praises Moroccan Real Madrid Fans

Rabat – After manager Carlo Ancelotti and many star players expressed their gratitude to Moroccan fans, Real Madrid president Florentino Perez also praised Moroccan Madridistas.The Los Blancos president known for his lavish spending on top players, said that the Moroccan fans who came to watch Real Madrid in Marrakech made his players feel as they were playing in the club’s stronghold of Santiago Bernabeu. He added that in Morocco, there are a lot of Moroccan supporters of Real Madrid ‘who make you feel like in your country.’Florentino Perez travelled to Morocco to attend Saturday’s final of the FIFA Club World Cup between Real Madrid and San Lorenzo. The Whites president has arrived in Marrakech alongside midfielder Luka Modric, who is currently out injured.Immediately after landing, the pair transferred to the team hotel in Marrakech. read more

Embraer shareholders approve jet joint venture with Boeing

CHICAGO — Shareholders of Brazilian aircraft maker Embraer have overwhelmingly approved spinning off the company’s commercial-airplane unit into a joint venture dominated by Boeing Co.Boeing will own 80 per cent of the venture, which values Embraer’s commercial-aircraft business at $5.26 billion.The deal gives Boeing a big stake in Embraer’s market for smaller regional jets and helps the Chicago company counter Europe’s Airbus, which last year bought a controlling stake in Canadian manufacturer Bombardier’s CSeries regional jet program.Boeing and Embraer said Tuesday the deal was favoured on 96.8 per cent of votes cast, with owners of about 67 per cent Embraer stock voting. The companies hope to win regulatory approvals and close the deal by year-end.Embraer shareholders also agreed to a joint venture with Boeing to market Embraer’s KC-390 military-transport plane.The Associated Press read more

UN agencies increase relief effort in South Asia after devastating floods

14 August 2007United Nations humanitarian agencies continue to step up their relief efforts in the wake of the recent deadly floods across South Asia, distributing food and emergency supplies, vaccinating against infectious diseases and launching public awareness campaigns on the importance of using clean water. The UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and the World Food Programme (WFP) have so far distributed 90 tons of high-protein biscuits in Bangladesh and plan to deliver another 24 tons this week, UN spokesperson Michele Montas told reporters today. In Nepal, also struck by this year’s exceptionally heavy monsoon rains, UNICEF has provided more than 2,000 mosquito nets. In addition, the agency has delivered radio broadcasts in the country’s four regional languages on the need for water purification to prevent the outbreak of diseases. An estimated 45 million people across India, Nepal, Bangladesh and Pakistan have been affected by the flooding, with many of them forced to leave their homes. At least 2,200 people have been killed. UNICEF is distributing water purification packs, rehydration packs and water jerry cans in India, where it is also conducting a large-scale vaccination campaign to prevent an outbreak of chicken pox. The UN’s Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) has already announced that it is increasing its support of South Asian governments as they respond to the flooding, including by drawing from the Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF). Elsewhere, in Sudan, which has been hit by its own recent floods, OCHA now estimates that at least 365,000 people have been affected, and the number of people requiring food assistance is also likely to rise. WFP is providing food rations to some 38,500 people in northern Sudan, the worst-affected region of the country, but also to more than 5,000 people in the south of the vast African nation. The World Health Organization (WHO) has pre-positioned medical supplies in several locations in anticipation of disease outbreaks and has also prepared a plan to prevent further outbreaks of diarrhoea. read more

Canadian tech firms receive 11B from investors in Q3 report finds

TORONTO — A new report says Canada’s venture-capital backed companies received about $1.1 billion from investors in the third quarter of the year, with artificial intelligence firms bringing in a record amount so far this year.The PwC Canada report says 81 deals in the quarter accounted for a 21 per cent jump in activity and 110 per cent increase in funding from the previous quarter.The growth comes after two quarters of declining investment, and the quarter represents a two-year high.PwC Canada says artificial intelligence companies have received a record year of funding in 2017’s first three quarters, accounting for roughly $244 million in 22 deals.Fintech companies have received about $256 million in 27 deals so far in 2017.National technology sector leader Chris Dulny says in a statement the firm looks forward to a strong close to the year. read more

Prosecutor Russian mans computer linked to hacking scheme

by Martha Bellisle, The Associated Press Posted Aug 15, 2016 8:29 pm MDT Last Updated Aug 15, 2016 at 9:20 pm MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email FILE – In this June 5, 2013, file photo, attorney John Henry Browne listens to questions from reporters at Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Washington state. Browne will be representing accused Russian computer hacker Roman Seleznev as jury selection for a federal trial begins Monday, Aug. 15, 2016, in Seattle. Prosecutors accuse Seleznev of hacking into U.S. business computer systems, mostly pizza restaurants in Washington state, and selling credit card data on underground internet forums. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File) Prosecutor: Russian man’s computer linked to hacking scheme SEATTLE – When federal agents arrested a Russian man in the Maldives in 2014, they found 1.7 million stolen credit card numbers on his laptop computer, a federal prosecutor told the jury Monday during opening statements.That was “1.7 million people who had eaten at the wrong restaurant and their personal information was sitting on that man’s computer,” Assistant U.S. Attorney Seth Wilkinson said of Roman Seleznev. He had collected the credit card numbers by hacking into restaurants in Washington and other states, Wilkinson said.“The evidence will show that for seven years, the defendant was one of the largest traffickers of stolen credit card numbers in the world,” Wilkinson said.Seleznev’s lawyer, John Henry Browne, said he will decide by Tuesday morning whether he will make an opening statement.Browne plans to argue that prosecutors have failed to adequately connect Seleznev with the computer hacks that hit more than 200 businesses over several years. Browne also will likely argue that the agents who took possession of Seleznev’s computer opened it without a warrant and may have tampered with or altered some of its data.The judge had previously refused to grant a motion to suppress the information taken from the computer, but said Browne can make the argument to the jury.Seleznev’s trial in U.S. District Court is expected to run more than two weeks.After the jury left for the day, Browne told U.S. District Judge Richard Jones that he objected to Wilkinson’s mention of Seleznev’s arrest in the Maldives. Browne and the Russian government had argued that the arrest was a kidnapping that violated international law. But Jones had ruled in earlier hearings that the kidnapping claim could not be brought up during trial.Wilkinson’s statements about the Maldives may be grounds for a mistrial motion, Browne said.The prosecutor’s opening statement laid out the history of the investigation into seven years of hacking.Agents started on Seleznev’s trail in 2010 after a deli in Idaho was hacked and credit card data was stolen, Wilkinson said. The U.S. Secret Service and local detectives traced the hack to a computer server in Russia, he said.The agents found some of the stolen credit card numbers being sold on a website being run by a hacker who used the nickname Track2, he said.Detective work eventually linked the point-of-sale hacking to stolen card sales and then to a computer server in Virginia, where some of the stolen data was stored.A search of that server found 170,000 stolen credit card numbers, but a review of its internet activity also revealed personal email activity of Roman Seleznev, he said.It showed that Seleznev had purchased a plane ticket in his own name, had bought flowers for his wife and had participated on an online poker club, Wilkinson said.“The agent found Roman Seleznev’s fingerprints all over the crime scene,” Wilkinson said. “This trial will be about exposing the fingerprints, that the defendant is Track2.”Seleznev was indicted in 2011, but the agents couldn’t arrest him in Russia. But in 2014 when they learned he was on vacation in the Maldives, they worked with local police to arrest him at the airport.He was brought back to the U.S. to face an indictment that was amended to include 40 felony counts that include bank and wire fraud, hacking and identity theft, Wilkinson said. read more

2018 Big Ten Football Preview Purdue Boilermakers

Location: West Lafayette, Indiana2017 record: 7-6 (4-5 Big Ten) Head coach: Jeff Brohm 2018 record: 1-3 (0-1 Big Ten) All-time record vs. OSU: 14-39-2https://youtu.be/Rp8kCS1nDt8What has happened thus far in 2018:Purdue has been better than its 1-3 record might suggest. With two losses that ended with last-second field goals, the Boilermakers’ three losses have been by a combined eight points. In losses to Northwestern and Missouri, Purdue came back from double-digit deficits in the first half to fall short in the waning moments of each game. Purdue recorded its first win of the season against then-No. 23 Boston College, beating the Eagles by 17 on Saturday. In that win, Purdue’s defense had four interceptions and held the Eagles to a 25 percent success rate on third down. On the offensive side of the ball, redshirt senior David Blough threw three touchdowns with 296 passing yards. Impact Player:Wide receiver Rondale Moore has exploded onto the scene as one of the nation’s standout freshmen for the Boilermakers. This season, he leads the Big Ten in receiving yards (372) and in receptions (33). He can be dangerous in the ground game as well, recording a 76-yard touchdown run against Northwestern in the season opener.Strengths:Certain teams have an identity when it comes to their strengths in football. For Purdue, it’s the play of the quarterback. Blough is ranked second in the Big Ten in passer rating (164.2), and passing yards (990). He is currently tied for first in the Big Ten among qualifiers with just one interception. Purdue has the No. 2 pass offense in the Big Ten, averaging 318.3 passing yards per game, while completing 68 percent of passes thrown. Weaknesses:In one word, inconsistency. Purdue can be explosive offensively and defensively stout. Nonetheless the Boilermakers have gotten off to slow starts, and haven’t been able to finish close games. In two of its three losses, Purdue has not been able to strike first. In the loss against Northwestern, all of the points Purdue gave up were in the first half. In each of its losses, Purdue has had the chance to win and failed to capitalize on it. read more

Older mothers on the rise as over40s become the only group with

first_imgOver-40s are the only age group with a growing pregnancy rate for the first time ever, new figures show. The Office for National Statistics said younger women were putting off having children, with many choosing to prioritise their careers. There were 28,744 conceptions to women in their 40s in 2016, a rise from just 12,032 in 1990. While every other group saw pregnancy levels fall, there was a rise in conceptions among over-40s from 2015 to 2016. The conception rate per 1,000 women has grown from 15.1 in 2015 to 15.4 in 2016, the latest figures from the Office for National Statistics show. Among all younger women conception rates dropped, with the biggest drops seen in the youngest age groups. Teen pregnancies have fallen by more than half in just under 30 years, with just 56,111 girls under 20 getting pregnant in 2016, compared to 113,330 in 1990.Fewer women in their early twenties are getting pregnant than at any point since the year 2000, while among women in their late twenties and thirties conception rates have dropped for the first time in a decade.  Nicola Haines, of the organisation’s vital statistics outputs branch, said: “Conception rates in England and Wales, for women aged under 18, declined by 8 per cent in 2015. Similar decreases were recorded for both maternities and abortions in this age group. “Under 18 conception rates have declined by 55 per cent since 1998, whilst for women aged 30 and over conception rates have increased by 34 per cent.”Some experts have suggested that teen pregnancy rates are dropping because young people are now more likely to be communicating remotely on social media.  The ONS said that “increased participation in higher education; increased female participation in the labour force, the increasing importance of a career, the rising opportunity costs of childbearing, labour market uncertainty and housing factors” were behind the shift.  Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.center_img A governmental teenage pregnancy strategy, launched in 2000, focused on halving the under-18 conception rate, has also been credited with the successful reduction in teen motherhood. Millennials and younger generations are also considered less reckless than previous generations, with rates of smoking and drinking both falling among young people. However, the UK still has one of the highest teenage birth rates in western Europe, with 6.4 live births to every 1,000 women aged 15 to 17 in 2015, compared to 4.1 in France, 3.6 in Germany, and 2.1 in Italy, according to sexual health charity FPA.Natika H Halil, its chief executive, said: “Teenage pregnancy can be a result of many different factors, but we know it can be reduced by investing the right time, resources and expertise into services and education.  “This investment not only saves money in the long term, but also helps prevent the range of negative long-term educational, health and social outcomes that young parents and their children are more likely to experience.”Most conceptions are now happening to women who are not married or in a civil partnership, with just 42 per cent of pregnancies in 2016 happening within a marriage. Almost one in three pregnancies to unmarried women end in abortion, compared to eight per cent of those to married women. The abortion rate among women over 40 has also dropped, from 43.2 per cent in 1990 to 28 per cent last year. last_img read more

Employers face landmark legal action over sexual harassment

Four major employers face a landmark legal action over the sexual harassment of staff, the Equality and Human Rights Commission has said. Organisations in the legal and education sectors could be subject to an official investigation by the Government-funded office after staff came forward to complain of ill treatment. The announcement comes after the commission’s report earlier this year which found that “corrosive” working cultures had silenced victims and normalised harassment. The identity of the employers is unknown as the Commission has not yet decided whether or not to launch the investigations, but the Daily Telegraph understands that they are high-profile within their sectors. The EHRC has launched only one other such investigation within the past few years, into unlawful harassment, discrimination and victimisation of black, female and gay police officers in the Metropolitan Police. The enforcement action could end in a court case and fine if the employers do not comply with the Commission’s recommendations. One of the current cases was brought to their attention after an individual woman approached the Commission with a dossier of evidence, while the other three were raised by solicitors who notified the EHRC of alleged sexual harassment victims that they were representing.”We’re currently looking at four potential enforcement actions in relation to sexual harassment. That’s up from not having looked at any last year and I think that reflects the fact that more is coming to us now,” said Elizabeth Prochaska, the organisation’s legal director.  Employers were unprepared for Me Too, which “caught people flat-footed”, added Sue Coe, also of the organisation. Both the legal and education sectors have had complaints and issues emerge in response to Me Too. Last November Susan Bassnett, a professor of comparative literature at the University of Glasgow, wrote in Times Higher Education that she had experienced unwanted attention from “some very senior men, including a handful of vice-chancellors, professors and well-known writers”.In March US law firm Latham & Watkins said its married chair and managing partner Bill Voge would step down after admitting the “exchange of communications of a sexual nature with a woman whom he has never met in person and who had no connection to the Firm”.  Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. “One of the issues we face is that it’s hard for us to get our hands on the evidence. Individual victims of harassment are not coming to us in significant numbers,” she added.Speaking to MPs on the Women and Equalities committee on Wednesday morning, she argued that women should not have to “endure a protracted legal process in order to get access to justice in order to remedy a terrible situation at work”. She said policymakers needed to lift the “crushing burden” of whistleblowing off individual women. The revelation follows the “Me Too” movement, which has prompted many women and men to speak up about their experiences of sexual harassment. In February it emerged that a partner at another firm, Baker McKenzie, had lost his job after allegations that he had sexually assaulted a female colleague several years ago. Several law firms have since told employees that they must declare romantic relationships with colleagues to a manager or their HR department.  read more

Employment discrimination PPP GECOM Commissioners have written to ERC Jagdeo

The People’s Progressive Party (PPP) nominated Guyana Elections Commission (GECOM) Commissioners have officially written to the Ethnic Relations Commission (ERC) with regards to the recent decision made by the Chairman of GECOM, retired Justice James Patterson to overlook top-ranked candidate Vishnu Persaud in favour of Roxanne Myers in the selection of a new Deputy Chief Elections Officer (DCEO) at the entity.Opposition Leader, Dr Bharrat JagdeoThis was confirmed on Thursday during a press conference with Opposition Leader, Dr Bharrat Jagdeo at his Church Street office.According to Jagdeo, “The Commissioners have already written to the Ethnic Relations Commission and we are going to ensure that there is a full-fledged investigation,” Jagdeo said.Moreover, he expressed optimism that the matter will be dealt with accordingly, since the Constitution clearly stipulates the mandate of the ERC in matters of discrimination.“The Constitution makes it very clear what it (ERC) can do and one of which is to provide equality within persons of different ethnic groups…investigate complaints of racial discrimination and make recommendations on measures to be taken if such complaints prove to be valid” he explained.Probed as to whether he expected any resolution from the ERC before the Elections, Jagdeo said “I hope that the ERC will work expeditiously.”File photo: PPP GECOM Commissioners L-R: Sase Gunraj, Robeson Benn and Bibi Shadick.On Tuesday last, the PPP Commissioners accused Patterson of employment discrimination by using his deciding vote to block the appointment of Persaud, in favour of Myers who was scored less by interviewers and said that they would approach the ERC over the matter.According to Commissioner, Bibi Shadick, Persaud received the top ranking vote at the end of the interview for the post, however, the position was handed to the second ranking interviewee, Myers.Commissioner Robeson Benn had expressed absolute disappointment on behalf of his colleagues, at Patterson’s decision to not appoint Persaud.Moreover, he maintained that Persaud was the best candidate for the job.Persaud was serving as the DCEO since 2014 at GECOM, however, when his contract expired at the entity; he was informed that he had to re-apply for the post.Last week, the Opposition nominated Commissioners walked out of a statutory meeting with the entity’s chairman after being disallowed from probing the concerns raised that a majority of the staff within GECOM are of one ethnic descent.Executive member of the PPP, Dr Roger Luncheon had said that the matter was brought to his attention by several sources who indicated their observations that the People’s National Congress (PNC) Commissioners at GECOM are allegedly engaged in a process to eliminate candidates for advertised positions at the GECOM Secretariat.On the heels of this, Jagdeo had said that his Party intends to continue their monitoring of the ethnic composition at the GECOM and “expose every breach at the entity’s level, so as to ensure free and fair future elections.”Moreover, Jagdeo had said that the issue of the ethnic composition of staff at GECOM has nothing to do with race but more to do with ensuring equality. “This is not about a race issue. This is a fairness issue. This is about equity, this is about rights of Guyanese to be treated fairly, equally, and not have …APNU people in there discriminate against people for political purposes… This is the worry that we have. This is about fairness, about the right to be treated fairly as a Guyanese,” he posited in a press conference prior to this one. (Ramona Luthi) Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedERC to meet Opposition Leader on GECOM ethnic bias complaintJune 23, 2018In “latest news”Raising issue of employment discrimination not about race, about equity- Opposition LeaderJune 7, 2018In “latest news”ERC meets with Opposition: Discussions on fairness, transparency broachedJuly 12, 2018In “latest news” read more

Formula Drift now has an electric Camaro race car and it totally

first_img 0 68 Photos Share your voice Tags 2018 Subaru Crosstrek: Just as good as before, only better Hyundai’s jumbo compact sedan communes with Google 2018 Chevrolet Camaro ZL1 1LE is a serious track weapon Electric Cars Car Culturecenter_img Post a comment 2019 Mercedes-Benz GLC350e review: Premium plug-in hybrid feels like an efficiency half-step Chevrolet Chevrolet More From Roadshow Even though electric vehicles are relatively commonplace on the highways and byways of America, they remain relatively uncommon on our race tracks. Sure, Formula E is starting to be a thing, and people are shredding time attacks and autocross events in Teslas, but loud cars powered by dead dinosaurs still dominate motorsport.That could be changing, at least in the world of drifting. See, drifting — in case you’ve been living under a rock for the last 10 years — is the sport where drivers expertly slide their cars around a circuit in tandem with another driver. It’s kind of like figure skating, but with tire smoke.The thing about drifting is that the runs are relatively short and torque is king, both things that pretty much scream electric motors. The folks from Napoleon Motorsports thought so too, so they took a new Camaro, ripped its gas-powered guts out and installed an electric drivetrain with 500 horsepower and 800 foot-pounds of torque, and they’re campaigning it during this season of Formula Drift.It’s pretty awesome. So awesome that the loud internet people from Donut Media decided to go and check this “EL-1” out in person and film it. The video is packed to the gills with memes but it’s rad and informative. Check it out and start cruising Craigslist for crashed EVs and weird sports cars like we do.last_img read more

Alaska News Nightly Tuesday August 2 2016

first_imgStories are posted on the APRN news page. You can subscribe to APRN’s newsfeeds via email, podcast and RSS. Follow us on Facebook at alaskapublic.org and on Twitter @aprnListen nowAlaska delegates criticize Trump’s remarks on Gold Star familiesLiz Ruskin, Alaska Public Media – AnchorageAlaska’s congressman and both U.S. senators are among the Republican lawmakers criticizing remarks Donald Trump made about the family of Captain Humayun Khan, a Muslim-American Army officer killed in Iraq.Walker sacks industry advocate from Marijuana Control BoardZachariah Hughes, Alaska Public Media – AnchorageOne of the state’s key regulators on commercial cannabis has been unexpectedly ousted by the governor.Marijuana Control Board Chair under fire for initiative to ban commercial pot on PeninsulaJenny Neyman, KBBI – HomerThe chair of the Alaska Alcohol and Marijuana Control Board is gathering signatures to have Kenai Peninsula Borough vote on outlawing commercial cannabis operations in areas of the borough outside cities. That isn’t sitting well with members of cannabis industry on the peninsula.Military’s $4B moving program keeps climbing — and no one is sure whyZachariah Hughes, Alaska Public Media – AnchorageEvery year, the US military moves hundreds of thousands of service members and their families all across the globe. And it isn’t cheap. In 2014, the Department of Defense spent more than $4.3 billion on moving costs — and a federal report found those costs are shooting up much faster than inflation. Officials don’t know where all that money is going. And they’re not even tracking enough data to start making reforms.To prevent Fairbanks flooding, Moose Creek Dam starts regulating the Chena River againDan Bross, KUAC – FairbanksThe Chena River Flood control project was built by the Army Corps of Engineers after the devastating 1967 flood in Fairbanks. The project’s main features, a dam and connected spillway, protect the community during heavy rains and reports the facility has gotten heavy use in recent weeks.Warm water Blob survives as El Niño diesMatt Miller, KTOO – JuneauIt’s being called a marine heat wave. The combination of the strongest El Niño in recent history and the warm water anomaly known as the Blob generated the greatest amount of warm ocean water that has ever been recorded, possibly affecting marine life up and down the West Coast.Small dam on slough helps Big Delta man protect his home along Tanana RiverTim Ellis, KUAC – FairbanksBig Delta resident Tom Gorman said a small dam he built earlier this year to protect his home from the meandering Tanana River held steady over the past couple of weeks as the river rose to near-flood level, due to recent rains. Gorman now hopes the river falls quickly enough to allow him to finish work on the dam before snow flies.last_img read more

ADN declares bankruptcy and new owners emerge

first_imgThe state’s largest newspaper is filing for bankruptcy protection, and may soon have new owners. The Alaska Dispatch News announced a deal this weekend that could turn the paper over to a publishing group made up of lifelong Alaskans.Listen nowIn an article on its front page Sunday, the Dispatch reported its owner, Alice Rogoff, is stepping down, with new owners taking control immediately. That group is made up of siblings from Fairbanks lead by businessman Ryan Binkley, along with Jason Evans, originally of Nome. Evans currently owns three small Alaska papers: the Arctic Sounder, Bristol Bay Times-Dutch Harbor Fisherman and Homer Tribune.In a statement that ran along-side the news article in ADN’s Sunday edition, the new owners say they are committed to keeping up the paper’s robust coverage of Anchorage and the state.The deal is not yet final. Evans wrote an email to staff at his papers Monday saying the new arrangement could fall apart “due to uncertainty of the the bankruptcy process.” Evans added that it’s the Binkley family that is seeking to “buy the paper out of bankruptcy,” and his main contribution is advice. That includes pushing the paper to hire Jerry Grilly, a former publisher of the Anchorage Daily News and Denver Post, whom Evans describes as a “newspaper turnaround expert.”The ADN is facing multiple lawsuits over allegations of unpaid bills and breached contracts. On Friday, telecom firm GCI filed a complaint seeking to recoup nearly $3 million and evict ADN from the warehouse space that houses the paper’s printing press. In a statement published by the Dispatch, Rogoff said it’s a “bittersweet moment” to be “handing off stewardship” of the paper. Adding that financial realities can’t be wished away.Rogoff bought the paper for $34 million in 2014.Neither Rogoff nor the new owners offered any information on the fate of the Dispatch’s current employees, or whether the company expects to downsize in the immediate future.last_img read more

MANUU signs MoU with Maxcure Hospitals

first_imgHyderabad: Maulana Azad National Urdu University and Maxcure Hospitals (Hyderabad) have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) for starting UGC sanctioned Bachelor of Vocational programmes in Medical Laboratory Technology (MLT) and Medical Imaging Technology (MIT) under National Skill Qualification Framework (NSQF) scheme. MANUU has launched these two programmes from the current academic year 2019-20. Also Read – Farmers stage rasta roko against urea shortage in Kamareddy Advertise With Us According to Dr S. Maqbool Ahmed, Nodal Officer, B.Voc Programmes, the MoU was signed by Dr M.A. Sikandar, Registrar, MANUU and Mr Hari Krishna, Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Maxcure Hospital in the presence of Dr. Mohammad Aslam Parvaiz, Vice-Chancellor, MANUU on 29th June 2019. Mr. Hari Krishna has given assurance to the Vice-Chancellor, that passouts of MANUU will be placed in their hospitals after completion of these courses. Also Read – Ramagundam: Focus on company’s growth, community development Advertise With Us Prof. P.F. Rahman, Dean, School of Sciences and Dr. S. Maqbool Ahmed gave brief introduction of B.Voc programmes. Dr. Durgesh, Centre Head, Maxcure Hospital, Dr. Suhas Chaudhary, Mr. Ravi Kumar from Maxcure Hospital and Prof. Syed Haseebuddin Quadri, Prof. N.I. Mulla, Dr. Aleem Basha, Dr. Khaja Moinuddin, Dr. Quasimullah and others from MANUU attended the signing ceremony.last_img read more

BNP interviews DNCC nomination seekers

first_imgBNP chairperson Khaleda Zia presiding over the party`s nomination board meeting to interview the mayoral aspirants in DNCC polls at her Gulshan office on Monday eveningThe BNP’s nomination board on Monday evening started interviewing the party nomination seekers to finalise its candidate for the by-election to Dhaka North City Corporation’s mayoral post, reports UNB.Party chairperson Khaleda Zia leads the nomination board comprising BNP standing committee members and its Dhaka North city unit vice-president and general secretary.All the five party nomination seekers earlier in the day submitted their forms with Tk 25,000 security money at the party’s Nayapaltan central office.The BNP’s special secretary Asaduzzaman Ripon, executive committee member Tabith Awal, assistant publication affairs secretary Shakil Wahed, Dhaka North city unit president MA Quayum, and former member of parliament major (retd) Akhtaruzzaman on Sunday collected the nomination papers for contesting the by-polls on the party ticket.The nomination board started the interview with Shakil Wahed around 9:45pm on Monday at the party chairperson’s Gulshan office.Four of them, except Quayum who is now staying in Malaysia, turned up at the BNP chief’s office for the interview.Party insiders said BNP secretary general Mirza Fakhrul Islam Alamgir might announce the name of the party-nominated candidate after the interviews of the nomination aspirants.Tabith contested the DNCC polls held on 28 April 2015 on BNP ticket and boycotted the voting halfway through bringing various allegations, including widespread vote rigging and obstruction to voters.As per the schedule declared by the election commission, the by-polls to the DNCC mayoral post will be held on 26 February.The DNCC mayoral post fell vacant with the death of Annisul Huq on 30 November last year.last_img

Medical Examiner Anticipates It Could Release Larry Greens Cause Of Death Within

first_img Share Photo via Twitter @PolicyMapperThe Harris County Institute of Forensic Sciences anticipates it could release the cause of death of Houston Councilman Larry Green sometime around the first week of April.The Harris County Institute of Forensic Sciences (HCIFS) anticipates it could release Larry Green’s cause of death within four weeks, according to the Institute’s Forensic Investigations and Emergency Management office.Dr. Jason Wiersema, director of the Forensic Investigations and Emergency Management office, detailed in an email that the autopsy of the deceased Houston Councilman, who was 52 years-old, was performed on March 7 and “the determination of Mr. Green’s cause and manner of death is pending ancillary analyses.” Those analyses, including toxicology testing, are ongoing and “after this testing is complete,” Dr. Wiersema noted in his email “HCIFS expects to have the information necessary to classify the cause and manner of death within a 4 week period.”A visitation and reception is scheduled for 4 p.m. on Sunday, March 11, at Sugar Land Mortuary, located in the 1800 block of Eldridge Road, as reported by KHOU-CBS Channel 11, while Green’s funeral will take place at Brentwood Baptist Church located in the 13000 block of Landmark St. on Monday, March 12, starting at 11:30 a.m.last_img read more

Odio is a nice looking but basic radio player

first_imgOdio is a nice looking but basic radio player by Martin Brinkmann on January 02, 2019 in Software – 21 commentsOdio is a cross-platform Internet radio player that can be run on Windows, Mac, and Linux devices natively to play radio streams.Internet users don’t need programs necessarily to play radio; some online sites and stations, e.g. the Shoutcast directory, offer direct playback in all modern browsers.Many media players, for instance my favorite music players AIMP and MusicBee, support radio playback as well.Users who prefer standalone programs for Internet radio playback have lots of options as well: programs like RadioMaximus, Screamer Radio, or Pocket Radio fall into that category.Odio is another standalone Internet Radio player. The Electron-based program offers all the advantages and disadvantages that come from being based on Electron: the program is cross-platform but fairly heavy for a radio player.Functionality-wise, it has the basics covered but there is definitely room for improvement. You may browse stations by country, language or tag, or use the built-in search functionality instead.The program supports a good number of stations both in popular and niche genres.Once you have found a station you may hit the play button right away to start playback; there is virtually no delay between hitting the play button and the start of the stream: good.Playback offers basic media playback controls but is fairly limited: one thing you may notice is that Odio does not display song or artist names.  Not all stations include metadata in their streams but the majority does.You may add a station to the library for quick access. There is also a recently viewed page to look at radio stations that you played previously.Closing Words and verdictOdio’s functionality ends at this point. While that may be sufficient for users who just want playback functionality, its functionality pales when compared to top of the class Radio programs such as StreamWriter which offers all that Odio offers and that much more: from adding radio stations to recording Internet radio streams and even maintaining a wishlist of songs to record when they are played on radio stations.Odio is responsive and it works as a program to stream Internet radio; it may work better for users who don’t want to use a browser to play Internet radio, but the lack of features means that it is less attractive than other radio players.Now You: Do you listen to Internet Radio? Which program(s) do you use?Summary12345 Author Rating2.5 based on 3 votes Software Name OdioSoftware Category MultimediaLanding Page https://www.odio.io Advertisementlast_img read more

VIDEO INTERVIEW Imaging Smack Down at SIIM AI Wont Soon Replace Radiologists

first_img Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Find more SCCT news and videos Information Technology View all 220 items Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Find more news and videos from AAPM. FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Recent Videos View all 606 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Find more SCCT news and videos Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Videos | Artificial Intelligence | May 24, 2018 VIDEO INTERVIEW: Imaging Smack Down at SIIM: AI Won’t Soon Replace Radiologists, Says Expert Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Find more SCCT news and videos Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Conference Coverage View all 396 items center_img ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr interviews Eliot Siegel, M.D., radiology professor at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and chief of Imaging Services at the VA Maryland Health Care System.It’s ridiculous to think that in the coming two decades, artificial intelligence will replace radiologists, says AI expert Eliot Siegel, M.D. Even if AI got good at reading medical images, “radiologists do much more than that,” he says.In the accompanying video interview, Siegel, a radiology professor at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and chief of Imaging Services at the VA Maryland Health Care System, will highlight these and other reasons why it’s ridiculous to think computers will replace radiologists. He’ll discuss them during a SIIM debate on the subject June 2 that will include Bradley J. Erickson, M.D., associate research chair in the radiology department at Mayo Clinic in Rochester. AI might not replace radiologists, but it could radically change the practice of radiology in just a few years, he says. During a SIIM session June 1, Siegel will moderate discussions among executives from several companies, including GE Healthcare and newcomer Aidoc, who will look at radiology AI applications and roadmap how these and future applications will incorporate AI. One thing is for sure, says Siegel: AI is going to dramatically increase radiologists’ use of lab data, genomics and digital pathology. Several of these data types may become integral parts of reading oncologic images, according to Siegel, who will provide details at SIIM May 31 in “Point-of-Care Precision Medicine: Real-time Radiomics-Genomics in the Reading Room.”Editor’s note: This pre-SIIM video interview is the first in a series of three by Greg Freiherr. The series features industry luminaries discussing key issues associated with the upcoming SIIM conference. The first interview, Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging Strategy featuring Kim Garriott, can be viewed here.Related Video: ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane discusses “Machine Learning and the Future of Radiology” with Eliot Siegel at SIIM 2017. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Find more SCCT news and videos Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Women’s Health View all 62 items Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Find more news and videos from AAPM. Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Find more news and videos from AAPM. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Eliot Siegel Pre-SIIM InterviewVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 4:18Loaded: 3.88%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -4:18 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Technology Reports View all 9 items Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Find more news and videos from AAPM.last_img read more